Text 22 Aug 129,914 notes Reblog this if I can ask you a whole bunch of inapproprite questions.

plain-dealing-villain:

Might even answer them.

(Source: fuck-up-nation)

Photo 21 Aug 273 notes pemberleydigital:

Frankenstein, MD comes alive tomorrow! Subscribe to pbsdigitalstudios  for new episodes every Tuesday and Friday at 9am PT.
Experience the story from the beginning:
Watch videos at PBS Digital Studios
Read blog posts at FrankensteinMD.com
Follow vfrankmd on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, and Instagram
Follow iggydelacey on Twitter and Tumblr
Keep an eye out for bonuses and extras on Pemberley Digital.

There are now 3 episodes up, for those of you who are interested. 

pemberleydigital:

Frankenstein, MD comes alive tomorrow! Subscribe to pbsdigitalstudios  for new episodes every Tuesday and Friday at 9am PT.

Experience the story from the beginning:

Keep an eye out for bonuses and extras on Pemberley Digital.

There are now 3 episodes up, for those of you who are interested. 

Photo 21 Aug 478 notes hysteriffic:

bonerdoctor:

fuck

(oh shit)

hysteriffic:

bonerdoctor:

fuck

(oh shit)

Photo 21 Aug 18,506 notes

(Source: ursorum)

via Helia.
Video 21 Aug 41,430 notes

postracialcomments:

4eversheneneh:

dragonheartedrabbit:

"Waste of good ammo. It’s my privilege to buy you a replacement box."

"All self-respecting whites have a moral responsibility to support our growing number of martyrs to the failed experiment called diversity."

"I thank all Police, you are the ‘Thin Blue Line’ protecting normal Americans from aggressive and entitled primitive savages. America is surely at the tipping point."

Just a few quotes (in case it’s hard to read) from that collection of donation messages for Darren Wilson.

Does anyone else want to say it’s not about race?

"At least one member of the CHICAGO POLICE supports you brother"

This is why, white people

Text 21 Aug 87,410 notes

traceexcalibur:

"talking about sexism or racism on Tumblr doesn’t solve anything"

really? because I am absolutely certain that I am a better, less bigoted person than I was a few years ago and that is most certainly due to the people I met and things I read on Tumblr

perhaps it doesn’t do anything for the worst of the worst but there are still plenty of people who do learn from impassioned Tumblr posts

Video 21 Aug 167,661 notes

selenophobic:

wethinktherefore:

kristaferanka:

uncannybrettwhite:

patbaer:

laughterkey:

bookshop:

heidi8:

teamfreekickass:

alexandertheprettyalright:

mamalaz:

Bradley Cooper and Vin Diesel 

Speaking their lines vs the final product

Why is Vin Diesel looking down? Is he worried he’s gonna forget his line?

Vin Diesel asked the director his inspiration for every line he did and did multiple takes until he was satisfied. He also recorded the line over 1,000 times and also recorded his lines in Mandarin, Portuguese, French, and Spanish so they could use his real voice in those versions. He’s looking at his lines because Vin Diesel is a  dedicated  motherfucking professional

And then he showed up at the LA premiere like this: 

Vin Diesel in an I AM GROOT shirt, on stilts, because he is awesome and magical

Stilts, people!

Vin Diesel is so fantastic every time I hear people mock him I just want to be like “excuse you, do you know of any other multi-racial actor in Hollywood who’s fronted a blockbuster franchise featuring an unashamedly multi-cultural cast full of primarily non-white actors, and who has done it unapologetically over and over again for *seven* installments? NO, YOU DON’T, SIT THE FUCK DOWN.”

<3 <3 <3

Vin Diesel makes goofy movies like The Pacifier so he can keep making Riddick movies. He even went so far as to found Tigon Studios to make sure the Riddick video game was good (it was awesome).

I love Vin Diesel!

In high school and college, when Vin Diesel really rose to box office prominence, I used to hate Vin Diesel because he seemed like the kind of dumb macho guy that A. made fun of me a lot and B., well, A’s enough, isn’t it? 

And then he went on “The Tonight Show” and talked in depth about his high school life as a hardcore D&D player. So. I’m on board with Vin Diesel now. And also, like, don’t judge people by how they look

i don’t even care about the gifs. reblogging for the comments and cause Vin is my boy. 

One of my favorite things ever was finding out Vin Diesel taught Judi Dench to play D&D

Can we also mention that the man can breakdance? Go on YouTube and there is plenty of evidence :)
Text 21 Aug 74,222 notes

bogmoth:

"Catholic schools give you a better education!" I was literally told dinosaurs were made up by scientists to lure me away from god

via melonbug.
Photo 21 Aug 43,609 notes jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

Photo 21 Aug 43,609 notes jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

Text 20 Aug 76,560 notes

huffleist-of-puffs:

cumber-bitches:

Stop making books into films and start making them into a tv show so we could have a lot more detail to them and they can stick to the book easier.

I thought this was going to make me annoyed but everything turned out better than expected

Quote 20 Aug 11,322 notes
In a study of injuries in 90 patients injured by rubber bullets, one died, 17 suffered permanent disabilities or deformities and 41 required hospital treatment after being fired upon with rubber bullets.
— So when the cops claim this is a humane, legitimate crowd control tactic, they’re straight up lying to your face. Don’t let them bullshit you. (x)

(Source: ahsadler)

Text 20 Aug 6,050 notes Tear Gas pro tips:

ironicdavestrider:

  • If you do not have chemical goggles, swim goggles will suffice and are easier to keep from confiscation.
  • Keep a plastic baggie with a bandana/rag soaking in lemon juice or cider vinegar to take out and breathe through if you encounter tear gas
  • Do not wear contact lenses without eye protection in tear gassed areas. You can go blind.
  • You can use water, saline, milk, and a mix of Maalox (or other liquid antacids) and water to relieve burning in your eyes and mouth. 
  • Know your allergies. Tear gasses are derived from different chili peppers.
  • Tear gas can aggravate breathing conditions, so bring your inhaler (in a plastic bag so it doesn’t get exposed).
  • If you are pregnant exposure to tear gas can result in miscarriages and birth defects. If you are nursing, the toxins can transfer through breast milk.
  • Do not swallow, try to spit and cough.
  • Wear protective clothing to avoid burns.
  • Children, the elderly, the immune-deficient, and the chronically ill are more susceptible to complications due to exposure.
Quote 20 Aug 7,443 notes
Commander Vimes didn’t like the phrase ‘The innocent have nothing to fear’, believing the innocent had everything to fear, mostly from the guilty but in the longer term even more from those who say things like ‘The innocent have nothing to fear’.
— Terry Pratchett (via beornwulf)

(Source: theredkite)

Video 20 Aug 52,575 notes

wilwheaton:

mjolnirismypenis:

imnothavinit:

Notice something in common in these photos?

It’s not what you think

I gave it away in the third pic

That’s right! None of these cops are wearing badges or name tags! I wonder why… seems like it’d be important to wear those, since it’s even illegal not to in other states…

This is actually illegal in all states. A police officer must be marked as such with name and badge at all times unless their jurisdiction states otherwise (such as an undercover officer), and even when not wearing a badge, the officer must have the badge accessible at all times and must show the badge in order to make an arrest. Name tags are not required as long as a badge is available because the badge has the officer number on it.

This has really been bothering me. The police in Ferguson are breaking the law by concealing their identities. Everyone knows this, it’s been going on for ten days, and it appears that nobody is doing anything about it.

The police are clearly and systematically violating the first amendment rights of the press, and they are getting away with it. This has been happening for days, and nobody appears to be doing anything about it.

A police officer pointed a rifle at a journalist and told him to fuck off *while he was being filmed, so he’s easily identifiable by his superiors*, and that police officer still has a job.

I know that not all cops are bad (or even most cops), but there are clearly bad cops in Ferguson, and they’re acting with complete impunity. I don’t understand why those cops aren’t being taken off the scene, and why a higher (possibly federal) authority isn’t coming in to address these things.


Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.